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Portuguese India Armadas: 4th Portuguese India Armada, Battle of Cochin, 7th Portuguese India Armada, 2nd Portuguese India Armada Source Wikipedia

Portuguese India Armadas: 4th Portuguese India Armada, Battle of Cochin, 7th Portuguese India Armada, 2nd Portuguese India Armada

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Published August 19th 2011
ISBN : 9781233115242
Paperback
80 pages
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 79. Chapters: 4th Portuguese India Armada, Battle of Cochin, 7th Portuguese India Armada, 2nd Portuguese IndiaMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 79. Chapters: 4th Portuguese India Armada, Battle of Cochin, 7th Portuguese India Armada, 2nd Portuguese India Armada, 5th Portuguese India Armada, Portuguese expedition to Sofala, 3rd Portuguese India Armada, 6th Portuguese India Armada, Casa da ndia, P ro de Anaia. Excerpt: The Fourth India Armada was assembled in 1502 on the order of King Manuel I of Portugal and placed under the command of D. Vasco da Gama. It was Gamas second trip to India. It was designed as a punitive expedition, targeting Calicut, to avenge the travails of the 2nd Armada and the massacre of the Portuguese factory in 1500. Along the way, in East Africa, the 4th Armada established a Portuguese factory in Mozambique, made contact and opened trade with the gold entrepot of Sofala and exorted tribute from Kilwa. Once in India, the armada set about attacking Calicut shipping and disrupting trade along much of the Malabar Coast. But the ruling Zamorin of Calicut refused to accede to Portuguese demands, arguing that the violent exactions of the armada exceeded any claims they might have for compensation. The 4th Armada left without bringing the Zamorin to terms and leaving matters unresolved. Before departing, the armada established a crown factory in Cannanore and left behind a small patrol under Vicente Sodr, the first permanent Portuguese fleet in the Indian Ocean. The Second India Armada, commanded by Pedro lvares Cabral, had arrived in Portugal in the summer of 1501 in a terrible shape. Ship and human losses were tremendous, its mission objectives failed. They had failed to establish a factory in Sofala, the outlet of the Monomatapa gold trade in East Africa, and, more worrisomely, opened hostilities with the city-state of Calicut (Calecute, Kozhikode), the principal commercial entrep t of the Kerala spice trade and dominant city-state on the Malabar coa...